Acidmath Digest

Acidmath Digest Blog

Psychedelic Erotic GIFs by Phazed

Posted by Bill Kovski on

Sex and psychedelia seem to be your main subjects. What’s the connection between the two, for you?

A couple of weeks ago, Jean Francois Painchaud was just another Canadian animator – working for the PBS kids show Wild Kratts by day, making sexually explicit GIFs by night. Little did he know, when he sat in front of his computer at 10AM last Monday, that things were going to change.

Jean Francois had been posting his erotic art on social networks under the alias Phazed for about two years without really getting anywhere. But on that day, Facebook decided to ban several of his illustrations at once; Suddenly, his Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook accounts welcomed more than 45,000 new followers. Jean Francois was finally breaking through.


Your work became viral after it was banned on Facebook. Did Facebook inadvertently do you a favour? 
In a way, yes. Soon after I started posting my art online, I found out that there are people out there who are very sensitive when it comes to the female body. Some get particularly upset when they see a nipple. No matter how much I censor my work, I still get reported. It’s ridiculous.

So, whenever they take down my art or censor me, I make a big deal out of it, hoping that we might be able to change this culture of incessant censoring over time. That’s the main thing I learned from practising Judo – to use whatever people throw at me, against them.

How did you start working with GIFs?
I studied game development for a year, then animation for another year and then conceptual art for one more year. I never finished any of those degrees – I just wanted to learn as much as possible, which usually happens in the first year or so. One day, I landed on some random video on Youtube, that showed you how to do animations using Photoshop. I felt like giving it a shot and soon realised it was a lot of fun, and that it also added a lot of life to a drawing.

How did mushrooms affect your work?
Mushrooms didn’t only help my art develop; they changed my entire life. Using mushrooms helped me overcome my depression, my insecurities and my anxiety. Most of that anxiety came from negative experiences with my father and being bullied at school.

Before I found shrooms, I was making art to improve my skills. It was as if I was trying to impress myself or show off. But what’s the point of sharpening your tools, if you’re never going to build something of your own?

Sex and psychedelia seem to be your main subjects. What’s the connection between the two, for you?
Sex and psychedelics have been very beautiful and inspiring experiences in my life – that’s the connection. I feel that both psychedelics and sex can help you transcend your ego and tap into a purer state of being – of living in the momen.

 

Read more

Psychedelic Erotic GIFs by Phazed

Posted by Bill Kovski on

Sex and psychedelia seem to be your main subjects. What’s the connection between the two, for you?

A couple of weeks ago, Jean Francois Painchaud was just another Canadian animator – working for the PBS kids show Wild Kratts by day, making sexually explicit GIFs by night. Little did he know, when he sat in front of his computer at 10AM last Monday, that things were going to change.

Jean Francois had been posting his erotic art on social networks under the alias Phazed for about two years without really getting anywhere. But on that day, Facebook decided to ban several of his illustrations at once; Suddenly, his Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook accounts welcomed more than 45,000 new followers. Jean Francois was finally breaking through.


Your work became viral after it was banned on Facebook. Did Facebook inadvertently do you a favour? 
In a way, yes. Soon after I started posting my art online, I found out that there are people out there who are very sensitive when it comes to the female body. Some get particularly upset when they see a nipple. No matter how much I censor my work, I still get reported. It’s ridiculous.

So, whenever they take down my art or censor me, I make a big deal out of it, hoping that we might be able to change this culture of incessant censoring over time. That’s the main thing I learned from practising Judo – to use whatever people throw at me, against them.

How did you start working with GIFs?
I studied game development for a year, then animation for another year and then conceptual art for one more year. I never finished any of those degrees – I just wanted to learn as much as possible, which usually happens in the first year or so. One day, I landed on some random video on Youtube, that showed you how to do animations using Photoshop. I felt like giving it a shot and soon realised it was a lot of fun, and that it also added a lot of life to a drawing.

How did mushrooms affect your work?
Mushrooms didn’t only help my art develop; they changed my entire life. Using mushrooms helped me overcome my depression, my insecurities and my anxiety. Most of that anxiety came from negative experiences with my father and being bullied at school.

Before I found shrooms, I was making art to improve my skills. It was as if I was trying to impress myself or show off. But what’s the point of sharpening your tools, if you’re never going to build something of your own?

Sex and psychedelia seem to be your main subjects. What’s the connection between the two, for you?
Sex and psychedelics have been very beautiful and inspiring experiences in my life – that’s the connection. I feel that both psychedelics and sex can help you transcend your ego and tap into a purer state of being – of living in the momen.

 

Read more


Artist takes 20 different Drugs and creates 20 illustrations to show Drug effects

Posted by Bill Kovski on

Graphic designer Brian Pollett, aka Pixel-Pusha, pusha-ed himself to the limit by doing a new drug every day for twenty days and making art. “The Binge project is inspired by my early explorations with psychedelics and electronic music parties,” Pollet told  “At this point in my life I desire to express what I’ve learned from psychedelics, the creative process, and electronic music.” We’ve covered artists like him before here.

 

Day 1 — Butylone

 how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-40

Day 2 — G.H.B.

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-32

Day 3 — Codeine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-33

Day 4 — T.H.C.

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-34

Day 5 — Alcohol

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-35

Day 6 — Nitrous

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-36

Day 7 — Cocaine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-37

Day 8 — Psilocybin

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-38

Day 9 — 4-HO-MIPT

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-39

Day 10 — Poppers

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-21

Day 11 — DMT

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-22

Day 12 — Ether

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-23

Day 13 — 25I

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-24

Day 14 — MXE

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-25

Day 15 — MDMA

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-26

Day 16 — Amphetamine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-27

Day 17 — Mescaline

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-28

Day 18 — Ketamine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-29

Day 19 — LSD

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-30

Day 20 — Love

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-31

 

“Imagine the past, future, and linear time are gone,” Pollett explained to A+. “You can just focus on your existence in the present. The idea of tomorrow is laughable. I can create art without concern of outsider judgment, without over analyzing my process, and intuitively enjoy creating the most honest work.” More info: psybry.net (h/t: aplus)

 

 


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Graphic designer Brian Pollett, aka Pixel-Pusha, pusha-ed himself to the limit by doing a new drug every day for twenty days and making art. “The Binge project is inspired by my early explorations with psychedelics and electronic music parties,” Pollet told  “At this point in my life I desire to express what I’ve learned from psychedelics, the creative process, and electronic music.” We’ve covered artists like him before here.

 

Day 1 — Butylone

 how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-40

Day 2 — G.H.B.

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-32

Day 3 — Codeine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-33

Day 4 — T.H.C.

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-34

Day 5 — Alcohol

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-35

Day 6 — Nitrous

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-36

Day 7 — Cocaine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-37

Day 8 — Psilocybin

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-38

Day 9 — 4-HO-MIPT

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-39

Day 10 — Poppers

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-21

Day 11 — DMT

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-22

Day 12 — Ether

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-23

Day 13 — 25I

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-24

Day 14 — MXE

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-25

Day 15 — MDMA

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-26

Day 16 — Amphetamine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-27

Day 17 — Mescaline

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-28

Day 18 — Ketamine

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-29

Day 19 — LSD

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-30

Day 20 — Love

how-different-drugs-affect-you-artist-illustrations-art-brian-pollett-31

 

“Imagine the past, future, and linear time are gone,” Pollett explained to A+. “You can just focus on your existence in the present. The idea of tomorrow is laughable. I can create art without concern of outsider judgment, without over analyzing my process, and intuitively enjoy creating the most honest work.” More info: psybry.net (h/t: aplus)

 

 


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In 1950s experiment artist used LSD and drew the same portrait for 8 hours to show how it affects Brain

Posted by Bill Kovski on

In the 1950s the US government did a lot of experiments with psychotomimetic drugs (in fact, as anybody who’s seen or read ‘The Men Who Stare At Goats’ will know, the US government used to do all sorts of weird and wonderful experiments). One of these experiments included feeding human test subjects measured quantities of LSD and then monitoring their ensuing behavior.

 

Related image 

In one particular experiment, Oscar Janiger, a University of California-Irvine psychiatrist known for his work on acid, gave an artist an activity box full of crayons and asked him to draw his experiences on LSD. And as you can see from these 9 illuminating images, the results are just as trippy as you’d expect. Things start out normally enough, but it doesn’t take long before the artist’s perception of reality starts to warp, and his drawings (which were recently uploaded by somebody called juraganyeri) capture in fascinating detail the various stages of his hallucinogenic journey, from the beginning of his trip right through to his comedown.

#1 Time: 20 Minutes After The First Dose (50ug)

 

 

An attending doctor observes – Patient chooses to start drawing with charcoal. The subject of the experiment reports – ‘Condition normal… no effect from the drug yet’.  

#2 Time: 85 Minutes After First Dose And 20 Minutes After A Second Dose Has Been Administered (50ug + 50ug)

 

 

The patient seems euphoric. ‘I can see you clearly, so clearly. This… you… it’s all… I’m having a little trouble controlling this pencil. It seems to want to keep going.’  

#3 Time: 2 Hours 30 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient appears very focused on the business of drawing. ‘Outlines seem normal, but very vivid – everything is changing colour. My hand must follow the bold sweep of the lines. I feel as if my consciousness is situated in the part of my body that’s now active – my hand, my elbow… my tongue’.    

#4 Time: 2 Hours 32 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient seems gripped by his pad of paper. ‘I’m trying another drawing. The outlines of the model are normal, but now those of my drawing are not. The outline of my hand is going weird too. It’s not a very good drawing, is it? I give up – I’ll try again…’  

#5 Time: 2 Hours 35 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

The patient follows quickly with another drawing. ‘I’ll do a drawing in one flourish… without stopping… one line, no break!’ Upon completing the drawing the patient starts laughing, then becomes startled by something on the floor.  

#6 Time: 2 Hours 45 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

The patient tries to climb into activity box, and is generally agitated – responds slowly to the suggestion he might like to draw some more. He has become largely non-verbal. ‘I am… everything is… changed… they’re calling… your face… interwoven… who is…’ Patient mumbles inaudibly to a tune (sounds like ‘Thanks for the memory’). He changes medium to Tempera.  

#7 Time: 4 Hours 25 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient retreated to the bunk, spending approximately 2 hours lying, waving his hands in the air. His return to the activity box is sudden and deliberate, changing media to pen and water colour.) ‘This will be the best drawing, like the first one, only better. If I’m not careful I’ll lose control of my movements, but I won’t, because I know. I know’ – (this saying is then repeated many times) Patient makes the last half-a-dozen strokes of the drawing while running back and forth across the room.  

#8 Time: 5 Hours 45 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient continues to move about the room, intersecting the space in complex variations. It’s an hour and a half before he settles down to draw again – he appears over the effects of the drug. ‘I can feel my knees again, I think it’s starting to wear off. This is a pretty good drawing – this pencil is mighty hard to hold’ – (he is holding a crayon).  

#9 Time: 8 Hours After First Dose

 

Patient sits on bunk bed. He reports the intoxication has worn off except for the occasional distorting of our faces. We ask for a final drawing which he performs with little enthusiasm. ‘I have nothing to say about this last drawing, it is bad and uninteresting, I want to go home now.’

Watch video:



Read more

In the 1950s the US government did a lot of experiments with psychotomimetic drugs (in fact, as anybody who’s seen or read ‘The Men Who Stare At Goats’ will know, the US government used to do all sorts of weird and wonderful experiments). One of these experiments included feeding human test subjects measured quantities of LSD and then monitoring their ensuing behavior.

 

Related image 

In one particular experiment, Oscar Janiger, a University of California-Irvine psychiatrist known for his work on acid, gave an artist an activity box full of crayons and asked him to draw his experiences on LSD. And as you can see from these 9 illuminating images, the results are just as trippy as you’d expect. Things start out normally enough, but it doesn’t take long before the artist’s perception of reality starts to warp, and his drawings (which were recently uploaded by somebody called juraganyeri) capture in fascinating detail the various stages of his hallucinogenic journey, from the beginning of his trip right through to his comedown.

#1 Time: 20 Minutes After The First Dose (50ug)

 

 

An attending doctor observes – Patient chooses to start drawing with charcoal. The subject of the experiment reports – ‘Condition normal… no effect from the drug yet’.  

#2 Time: 85 Minutes After First Dose And 20 Minutes After A Second Dose Has Been Administered (50ug + 50ug)

 

 

The patient seems euphoric. ‘I can see you clearly, so clearly. This… you… it’s all… I’m having a little trouble controlling this pencil. It seems to want to keep going.’  

#3 Time: 2 Hours 30 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient appears very focused on the business of drawing. ‘Outlines seem normal, but very vivid – everything is changing colour. My hand must follow the bold sweep of the lines. I feel as if my consciousness is situated in the part of my body that’s now active – my hand, my elbow… my tongue’.    

#4 Time: 2 Hours 32 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient seems gripped by his pad of paper. ‘I’m trying another drawing. The outlines of the model are normal, but now those of my drawing are not. The outline of my hand is going weird too. It’s not a very good drawing, is it? I give up – I’ll try again…’  

#5 Time: 2 Hours 35 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

The patient follows quickly with another drawing. ‘I’ll do a drawing in one flourish… without stopping… one line, no break!’ Upon completing the drawing the patient starts laughing, then becomes startled by something on the floor.  

#6 Time: 2 Hours 45 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

The patient tries to climb into activity box, and is generally agitated – responds slowly to the suggestion he might like to draw some more. He has become largely non-verbal. ‘I am… everything is… changed… they’re calling… your face… interwoven… who is…’ Patient mumbles inaudibly to a tune (sounds like ‘Thanks for the memory’). He changes medium to Tempera.  

#7 Time: 4 Hours 25 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient retreated to the bunk, spending approximately 2 hours lying, waving his hands in the air. His return to the activity box is sudden and deliberate, changing media to pen and water colour.) ‘This will be the best drawing, like the first one, only better. If I’m not careful I’ll lose control of my movements, but I won’t, because I know. I know’ – (this saying is then repeated many times) Patient makes the last half-a-dozen strokes of the drawing while running back and forth across the room.  

#8 Time: 5 Hours 45 Minutes After First Dose

 

 

Patient continues to move about the room, intersecting the space in complex variations. It’s an hour and a half before he settles down to draw again – he appears over the effects of the drug. ‘I can feel my knees again, I think it’s starting to wear off. This is a pretty good drawing – this pencil is mighty hard to hold’ – (he is holding a crayon).  

#9 Time: 8 Hours After First Dose

 

Patient sits on bunk bed. He reports the intoxication has worn off except for the occasional distorting of our faces. We ask for a final drawing which he performs with little enthusiasm. ‘I have nothing to say about this last drawing, it is bad and uninteresting, I want to go home now.’

Watch video:



Read more


Rainbow Village: Indonesian Government invests $22,467 to paint 232 slum Houses, and result is amazing

Posted by Bill Kovski on

Why go somewhere over the rainbow when you can just hang out inside of it? Kampung Pelangi, a small village in Indonesia, has transformed itself into a stunning display of bright colours and whimsical designs, a huge departure from its former state of squalor. The Central Java community, located in a southern district of Semarang, spent over $22k on the magnificent makeover in a bid to shake off its status as a degraded slum. Initiated by 54-year-old junior high principal Slamet Widodo, the project was inspired by at least 3 other towns in the country that adopted similar paint jobs, and has turned at least 232 homes in Kampung Pelangi into works of art. Creative murals adorning the walls of narrow passageways burst with life, giving a veritable pulse to the whole village. Tourists have definitely taken early notice of Indonesia’s growing rainbow village trend, and have flocked to them accordingly, including Kampung Pelangi. The investments made in revamping the former slum are sure to pay off, as local businesses are already seeing a rise in souvenir and food sales, according to the Indonesian Builders Association. It goes without saying that the lively, bohemian atmosphere of this newfound hot spot is also gold for Instagram shots! A former run-down slum in Central Java, Indonesia has received a dazzling makeover.

 

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia--(29) 

It all started when junior high school principal Slamet Widodo, 52, saw the need to improve his community.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (1)  

He proposed the painting of all 390 houses in Kampung Pelangi, his native village, in bright colours.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (2)  

The government then pledged over $22k towards the initiative, and the transformation began.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (8)  

Overseen by mayor Hendrar Prihadi, 232 homes in the area have now been adorned with art.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (3)

  The project encourages “the active involvement of citizens in the improvement of their home,” says Prihadi.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (7)  

In addition to filling the town with art, residents will also undertake the cleaning of the nearby river.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (6)  

Kampung Pelangi follows the example of at least 3 other former slums, including the famous Jodipan Village.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (10)  

Since beautifying their village, Kampung Pelangi has seen a sudden increase in international tourism.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (12)  

It’s no surprise why – these rainbow streets are gold for Instagram photos, and #kampungpelangi is blowing up.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (11)  

This rapid influx of visitors has led to a jump in local food and souvenir sales, benefiting the local economy.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (14)

The future is bright and colourful for Kampung Pelangi thanks to the amazing power of art.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (15)

Read more

Why go somewhere over the rainbow when you can just hang out inside of it? Kampung Pelangi, a small village in Indonesia, has transformed itself into a stunning display of bright colours and whimsical designs, a huge departure from its former state of squalor. The Central Java community, located in a southern district of Semarang, spent over $22k on the magnificent makeover in a bid to shake off its status as a degraded slum. Initiated by 54-year-old junior high principal Slamet Widodo, the project was inspired by at least 3 other towns in the country that adopted similar paint jobs, and has turned at least 232 homes in Kampung Pelangi into works of art. Creative murals adorning the walls of narrow passageways burst with life, giving a veritable pulse to the whole village. Tourists have definitely taken early notice of Indonesia’s growing rainbow village trend, and have flocked to them accordingly, including Kampung Pelangi. The investments made in revamping the former slum are sure to pay off, as local businesses are already seeing a rise in souvenir and food sales, according to the Indonesian Builders Association. It goes without saying that the lively, bohemian atmosphere of this newfound hot spot is also gold for Instagram shots! A former run-down slum in Central Java, Indonesia has received a dazzling makeover.

 

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia--(29) 

It all started when junior high school principal Slamet Widodo, 52, saw the need to improve his community.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (1)  

He proposed the painting of all 390 houses in Kampung Pelangi, his native village, in bright colours.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (2)  

The government then pledged over $22k towards the initiative, and the transformation began.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (8)  

Overseen by mayor Hendrar Prihadi, 232 homes in the area have now been adorned with art.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (3)

  The project encourages “the active involvement of citizens in the improvement of their home,” says Prihadi.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (7)  

In addition to filling the town with art, residents will also undertake the cleaning of the nearby river.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (6)  

Kampung Pelangi follows the example of at least 3 other former slums, including the famous Jodipan Village.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (10)  

Since beautifying their village, Kampung Pelangi has seen a sudden increase in international tourism.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (12)  

It’s no surprise why – these rainbow streets are gold for Instagram photos, and #kampungpelangi is blowing up.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (11)  

This rapid influx of visitors has led to a jump in local food and souvenir sales, benefiting the local economy.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (14)

The future is bright and colourful for Kampung Pelangi thanks to the amazing power of art.

rainbow-village-kampung-pelangi-indonesia- (15)

Read more


Architecture Student Spends 10 Months Drawing New York City In Incredible Detail

Posted by Bill Kovski on

Egyptian young man Hossam Mohamed drew New York city just on 70*100 cm paper incredible detail. It took him 10 months to finish this ink drawing. Hossam is still an undergraduate student in the architecture department. He started drawing 2 years ago but he is a talented teacher already.

The biggest Hossam dreams are to complete his postgraduate studies in Italy, to be a known man, and make a great gallery.

He said: “I’m sure that if there is a mind of a dreamer and a man is working hard, he will achieve whatever he wants.”

 

 

 

 

 



Read more

Egyptian young man Hossam Mohamed drew New York city just on 70*100 cm paper incredible detail. It took him 10 months to finish this ink drawing. Hossam is still an undergraduate student in the architecture department. He started drawing 2 years ago but he is a talented teacher already.

The biggest Hossam dreams are to complete his postgraduate studies in Italy, to be a known man, and make a great gallery.

He said: “I’m sure that if there is a mind of a dreamer and a man is working hard, he will achieve whatever he wants.”

 

 

 

 

 



Read more