Acidmath Digest

Acidmath Digest Blog

Rainbow tunnel made of 120,000 paper numbers visualizes the passage of time

Posted by Bill Kovski on

Tokyo-based architect and designer Emmanuelle Moureaux is known for creating multi-sensory installation art using bright colors as three-dimensional elements. For her latest project, as part of an ongoing 100 Colors series, Moureaux created her largest rainbow-hued art installation to date. Most recently on show at the Toyama Prefectural Museum of Art and Design in Toyama, Japan, the Color of Time installation comprises 120,000 number-shaped paper cut-outs that fill the entire room, and “float” in a three-dimensional, grid-like structure composed of 100 layers. Visitors are able to walk through the rows of floor-to-ceiling colored paper numbers that range from 0 to 9. Each row of numbers denotes a time of day, from sunrise at 6:30 a.m. to sunset at 7:49 p.m. As the viewer advances, the cut-outs gradually change in color from vibrant rainbow hues to darker shades, and eventually black, visualizing the passing of time from day into night. “Through the tunnel, the sky is tinted with a beautiful gradation changing from pale to deep colors, flowing from time to time,” the museum explains. The sensory exhibition “makes one feel the subtle changes in [the] atmosphere through the whole body by traveling the colorful flow of time.” The installation closed on January 8, 2018 in Toyama; however, Moureaux is planning to exhibit 100 Colors in different cities around the world. Keep an eye on her Facebook and Instagram pages for announcements, as well as a behind-the-scenes look into the artist’s colorful world. The Color of Time installation by Tokyo-based artist Emmanuelle Moureaux comprises 120,000 rainbow-colored paper number cut-outs.  

 

Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux  

The floor-to-ceiling, three-dimensional grid-like structure visualizes the passing of time.

Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux 

Each row of numbers denotes a time of day and gradually changes color from vibrant rainbow hues, to darker shades, representing the transition from day to night.

Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux  

Original Source

Read more

Tokyo-based architect and designer Emmanuelle Moureaux is known for creating multi-sensory installation art using bright colors as three-dimensional elements. For her latest project, as part of an ongoing 100 Colors series, Moureaux created her largest rainbow-hued art installation to date. Most recently on show at the Toyama Prefectural Museum of Art and Design in Toyama, Japan, the Color of Time installation comprises 120,000 number-shaped paper cut-outs that fill the entire room, and “float” in a three-dimensional, grid-like structure composed of 100 layers. Visitors are able to walk through the rows of floor-to-ceiling colored paper numbers that range from 0 to 9. Each row of numbers denotes a time of day, from sunrise at 6:30 a.m. to sunset at 7:49 p.m. As the viewer advances, the cut-outs gradually change in color from vibrant rainbow hues to darker shades, and eventually black, visualizing the passing of time from day into night. “Through the tunnel, the sky is tinted with a beautiful gradation changing from pale to deep colors, flowing from time to time,” the museum explains. The sensory exhibition “makes one feel the subtle changes in [the] atmosphere through the whole body by traveling the colorful flow of time.” The installation closed on January 8, 2018 in Toyama; however, Moureaux is planning to exhibit 100 Colors in different cities around the world. Keep an eye on her Facebook and Instagram pages for announcements, as well as a behind-the-scenes look into the artist’s colorful world. The Color of Time installation by Tokyo-based artist Emmanuelle Moureaux comprises 120,000 rainbow-colored paper number cut-outs.  

 

Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux  

The floor-to-ceiling, three-dimensional grid-like structure visualizes the passing of time.

Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux 

Each row of numbers denotes a time of day and gradually changes color from vibrant rainbow hues, to darker shades, representing the transition from day to night.

Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux Color of Time Rainbow Installation by Emmanuelle Moureaux  

Original Source

Read more


LSD Visual Simulations Made Possible With These New Sunglasses

Posted by Bill Kovski on

These intriguing spectacles may look a little strange, but they are far more than a funny looking pair of glasses. Designed by Hungarian artist Bence Agoston, the ‘Mood Sunglasses’ have been created with the purpose simulating hallucinatory, visual experiences similar to those induced by LSD but how would one begin to design such a thing?

The glasses come with six pairs of lens inserts, all uniquely based off Moiré patterns that filter either green, red, or blue light. The lenses can be layered together and rotated individually, resulting in new patterns and color combinations forming right before the eyes of the wearer.

“Because each color filters the incoming lights differently, and the patterns can overlap each other or leave blank fields, the new view is completely random and twisted,” said Agoston. “The ideal situation for use is during travel, when people listen to music, just looking out the window and watching the ever-changing sights, in perfect harmony with the music. The shape is designed with the aim of simplicity and distinctness, as if the wearer belongs to a kind of subculture.”

 

Read more

These intriguing spectacles may look a little strange, but they are far more than a funny looking pair of glasses. Designed by Hungarian artist Bence Agoston, the ‘Mood Sunglasses’ have been created with the purpose simulating hallucinatory, visual experiences similar to those induced by LSD but how would one begin to design such a thing?

The glasses come with six pairs of lens inserts, all uniquely based off Moiré patterns that filter either green, red, or blue light. The lenses can be layered together and rotated individually, resulting in new patterns and color combinations forming right before the eyes of the wearer.

“Because each color filters the incoming lights differently, and the patterns can overlap each other or leave blank fields, the new view is completely random and twisted,” said Agoston. “The ideal situation for use is during travel, when people listen to music, just looking out the window and watching the ever-changing sights, in perfect harmony with the music. The shape is designed with the aim of simplicity and distinctness, as if the wearer belongs to a kind of subculture.”

 

Read more